#womenwrites: on gender, identity politics and VAWG

All politics is “identity politics” by @MayaGoodfellow
via @WritersofColour

Charlotte Bronte did NOT repair her mourning shoes with her dead sister’s hair! by @KatharineEdgar

‘Impunity has consequences’: the women lost to Mexico’s drug war by Nina Lakhani in Jalapa

Princesses Are Terrifying. So Is Ivanka Trump via @ElleMagazine

Maybe We Do Need White History Month or Millennials Don’t Know Shit About Slavery or Picking Appropriate Essay Topics or Being a Black English Adjunct Sucks Sometimes– via @writermrsmith

I’m Tired by @RowenaMonde  via @RoomOfOurOwn

A brief history of ‘gender’  via @wordspinster

On Optimism and Despair by Zadie Smith

National Geographic’s ‘gender revolution’ cover fails women via @FeministCurrent

#womenwrites(November/16)

#womenwrites (11.12) – on 16 Days of Activism to EVAW

What lies beneath prostitution policy in New Zealand? by Maddy Coy and Pala Molisa at  openDemocracy

All day, everyday’: where is the protection against violence in schools and universities? by Sarah Green and Leah Cowan| openDemocracy

Singleness and the world of ‘not belonging‘ ASHA L. ABEYASEKERA openDemocracy

Pubic hair has a job to do – stop shaving and leave it alone | Emily Gibson

Are universities preventing violence against women? by @_HelenMott_  at openDemocracy

To exist is to resist: Million Women Rise by SABRINA QURESHI| openDemocracy

The voice of Berta Cáceres has become the voice of millions DAYSI FLORES | openDemocracy

Dangerous journeys: violence against women migrants in Turkey by Yasemin Mert | openDemocracy

16 Days: survivors and activists at the centre by Liz Kelly openDemocracy

The Italian mafia and violence against women | openDemocracy

The end of domestic violence support for black and brown women in the UK? by REBECCA OMONIRA-OYEKANMI| openDemocracy

A Room of Our Own: An Anthology of Feminist & Womanist Writing

screen-shot-2016-12-05-at-10-44-24A Room of Our Own: An Anthology of Feminist & Womanist Writing is now available:

Paperback

Kindle

CreateSpace

 

 

A Room of Our Own: An Anthology of Feminist & Womanist Writing is a collection of essays, poetry, and short stories written by women. The proceeds of this book will be used to support this platform covering the costs of hosting and website maintenance and development.

Table Of Contents

Room For Our Dangerous Ideas  

Hair by Poppy O’Neill

Used Goods by Durre Mughal

Celeste by Lucy Middlemass

Practicing Self-Love by Priscilla Lugo

Room For Our Courage  

Prologue/Epilogue by Lorrie Hartshorn

Your Silence Will Not Protect You: Racism in the Feminist Movement by Claire Heuchan

An Indian woman by Sunayna Pal

The Outsider Within: Racism in the Feminist Movement by Claire Heuchan

Abortion by Erika Garrett

Room For Our Anger

Cyborg by Susan Dunsford

You women! You’re such bitches by Cath Bore

The Colour of Justice by Estella Muzito

Room For Ourselves

Sister, mother by Lorrie Hartshorn

Because Ogwugwu Said So by Egoyibo Okoro

Giving birth in a dictatorship by Erika Garrett

Feminist Mothering with Fibromyalgia by Louise Pennington

Room For Our Escape

Hollywood’s Woman Problem in Action Films by Christina Paschyn

Room For Our Future

What’s in a Word? by Millie Slavidou

Mother’s Lament by Susan Dunford

An Open Letter to Our Immigrant Parents by Priscilla Lugo

Being Chicana in College by Priscilla Lugo

Love Sick by Erika Garrett

Room For Our Knowledge  

I am not your Mami by Priscilla Lugo

Understanding Feminist Standpoints: Situated Knowledges of Gender, Race, and Class Inequality by Egoyibo Okoro

Hysteria in Performance: The subversive potential of performative malady by Effie Samara

My Mother Said by Durre Mughal

Transforming a victim blaming culture

evb-logo-1Media discussions of male violence against women focus on the actions of the victim rather than the perpetrator. How can we challenge this narrative using survivor’s testimony without putting them at risk of online harassment?

 

“If I was Ched Evans i would find that whore and actually rape her this time!!”

This is one of the many abusive and threatening messages directed at the victim in the rape trials (and appeals) of footballer Ched Evans’ over the past 4 years. She has experienced an incessant barrage of abuse and threats of physical and sexual violence via Twitter, alongside a deliberate smear campaign including repeated breaches of her anonymity. She has also received a tremendous amount of support from women across the UK. Her experiences demonstrate both the importance of centering the voices of survivors, who are frequently disbelieved, but also the limitations, particularly with the development of social media platforms predicated on notions of ‘free speech,’ that allow survivors of rape to be labeled ‘a fucking cunt’ or ‘lying psycho bitch’.   Social media platforms have, to date, been unwilling to have honest discussions of the reality, representation, and ubiquity of male violence against women and girls, despite a recent EU report that suggests 1 in 3 women between the ages of 18-74 have experienced sexual or physical violence. …

Read the full post at Open Democracy.

#womenwrites

Since I gave you a phone it’s not rape by GUILAINE KINOUANI at openDemocracy

Do I Just Want My Child To Be Happy?  via @cwknews

Femicide – Men’s Fatal Violence Against Women Goes Beyond Domestic Violence by via

10 reasons why I will ignore White Ribbon day by Nina Funnell

The white working class is another form of identity politics by Maya Goodfellow

Andrea Dworkin – Behind the Myth by @Finn_Mackay  via @RoomOfOurOwn

White Skin, Black Masks: On the “Decolonial Desire” of Vasco Araújo by Efua Bea via

What Whiteness Means in the Trump Era by Nell Irvin Painter

When a Man Kills a Woman  by @K_IngalaSmith at openDemocracy

 

16 ways to End Violence against Women and Girls

These are just a few of the ways that you can support women’s services during the 16 Days of Activism to Eliminate Male Violence against Women and Girls.

  1. Donate £1 to a different specialist women’s service like the national organisations Rape Crisis, Women’s Aid, or Refuge every day.
  2. Donate £1 to your local service providers supporting women who are living with domestic and sexual violence and abuse. BME women’s services have been disproportionately impacted by so-called ‘austerity’ so please don’t forget them.
  3. Share fundraisers for women’s services across social media. We understand that many women can not afford to donate £1. Sharing fundraisers is just as essential as being able to donate £1.
  4. Host a coffee morning for your friends to raise money.
  5. Bring some baked goods into work and ask for donations to a service of your choice from your co-workers.
  6. Collect clothing, bedding and any other unused household items to donate to your local refuge or those support services for women who are homeless, living in poverty etc.
  7. Donate toys to a local refuge for children who will be living in them at Christmas or those support services for women who are homeless, living in poverty etc..
  8. Donate new toiletries and another nice gifts for teenage girls and women living in refuges.
  9. Make a donation to your local food bank. All women are disproportionately impacted by poverty and austerity measures. Women living with violence are disproportionately impacted by cuts to housing benefits and women’s services. 
  10. Donate sanitary products to food banks. These are essential for women and teenage girl’s access to education and work. 
  11. Write to your local councillors, MP, or MSP to demand ring-fenced funding for women’s specialist services, including those for BME women or those with disabilities.
  12. Write to local councillors, MP, MEP, or MSP and ask them to undergo specialist training on domestic and sexual violence and abuse from specialist organisations.
  13. Write to your MP and MSP demanding they support the campaigns to end the detention of refugee women and children.
  14. Write to your MP and MSP demanding mandatory sex and healthy relationships education in schools, as well as campaigns to make schools safer for girls.
  15. File complaints with media about inappropriate, misleading and offensive coverage of domestic and sexual violence and abuse.
  16. And, if you’re a man, stand up for women’s rights. Challenge men who make rape jokes. Call out male friends who refuse to financially support their children. Insist your employer implement the equal pay legislation. Donate money to rape crisis centres and refuges. Wearing a white ribbon isn’t enough. Your need to do the work to end violence against women and girls.

You can find the address and contact details of your local councillor via  WriteToThem.

 

This post was originally published on Everyday Victim Blaming.

Feminism for Girls – I need your help with answers for my daughter!

Last week, my daughter asked if I had any books on feminism that she could read. The only one I could think of was Peggy Ornstein’s Cinderella Ate My Daughter as she’s not quite old enough for Kat Banyard’s The Equality Illusion. Her response: we need to write one. So, we are.

Below is the post she wrote for her blog Generation Why. She’s looking for a range of answers to the three questions below to include in the book. The book is aimed at girls 8-13ish.

All answers and comments greatly appreciated!

 

This morning I asked my Mum if she had any books I could read on feminism. I found out that there weren’t very many books about feminism for girls my age. The only book that Mum had for me to read was Cinderella Ate My Daughter.unknown

We decided we would write a book on feminism for people my age. These are things we want to include what is feminism, misrepresentation of women, history of feminism and what women think feminism is.

 

These are the three questions I would like women to answer so that I can include them in the book:

  1. What is feminism to you?
  2. Why are you a feminist?
  3. Who inspired you to become a feminist?

unknown

 

You can post your answers to the questions in the comments below or you can email them to louisepennington@hotmail.co.uk

You can also send us any ideas you would like us to include in the book.

#womenwrites (20.11)

White Skin, Black Masks: On the “Decolonial Desire” of Vasco Araújo by Efua Bea  via @WritersofColour

What Whiteness Means in the Trump Era by Nell Irvin Painter

The Problem with “Innocent” Ignorance: Racism, Whiteness & the Working Class by @saramsalem

Why I Reclaim the Night: Being a Black Woman in Public Space by @ClaireShrugged

Why do women fail to vote as a class? by Susan Cox  via @FeministCurrent

Preparing Your Children For The Apocalypse by @jendella
via @WritersofColour

We’ve Got the Diagnosis on Inequality; Where’s the Action Plan? by @madomasi  via @WritersofColour

Black History Month An Introduction to Welsh Writers by @Durre_Shahwar.  via @RoomOfOurOwn

I run therefore I am: How conscious movement can set your mind free by @AliyaMughal1  via @RoomOfOurOwn

Why I Do Not Support The Women’s March on Washington by Brittany Oliver

An Open Letter to White Liberal Feminists by LeRhonda S. Manigault-Bryant
via @aaihs

Don’t call Clinton a weak candidate: it took decades of scheming to beat her by Rebecca Solnit

Is the term FGM cissexist? by Kalwinder Sandhu

#womenwrites (12.11)

Get Your People at Crunk Feminist Collective

About the ‘Left’ and its Discontents in These Perilous Times  via @sunnysingh_nw3

It’s too soon for you by Talat Yaqoob

Make no mistake – Donald Trump’s victory represents a racist “whitelash” by Maya Goodfellow

White women sold out the sisterhood and the world by voting for Trump.  via @doublexmag

After the election of Donald Trump, we will not mourn. We will organize | Gloria Steinem

“On ‘Woke’ White People Advertising their Shock that Racism just won a Presidency” by Courtney Parker West

7 Women Besides Susan B. Anthony Whose Graves Deserve “I Voted” Stickers at Bustle

Blood, Sweat and Tears: Medieval Literature, Cambridge, and Leonard Cohen  via @LucyAllenFWR

Equal Rights; Different Needs   by Polly Neate

Breaking the Cycle: the challenges of parenting after an abusive childhood  via @WomanAsSubject

If women aren’t a class, there’s no such thing as radical feminism by Cherry Blossom Life

Bounty should be banned from maternity wards by @lisaaglass

The Importance of Conversations and Community by @jendella
via @WritersofColour