Justin Trudeau is not a Feminist Superhero: Part II

French President Emmanuel Macron has fulfilled an election pledge for gender parity in his cabinet. Obviously, this is a good thing. Unless you read the Huffington Post who credit Justin Trudeau, Prime Minister of Canada, with the phrase ‘pulls a Trudeau’ in the headline. Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 13.33.49

Because no one ever thought about gender parity before Justin Trudeau. Who is now a God among men: what with his constant photo ops with pandas and taking his kid to work. Obviously, Trudeau clearly spent the entire day balancing childcare and being Prime Minister. And, had no help whatsoever from anyone.

Screen Shot 2017-05-21 at 13.41.43

 

The Huffington Post cleverly forgets to mention that the previous French President, Francois Hollande, also had a cabinet that was 50% women.* Or, the years of feminist activism and policy development on the importance of gender parity. Because only men count.

The constant referencing of Justin Trudeau as a feminist superhero is so beyond tedious that I can’t quite understand how many people believe this. For the record, having gender parity in your cabinet does not make you a feminist; nor does taking your kid to work when you are the boss in a building full of staff capable of caring for your kid.

Before you start banging on about how feminist Trudeau is, it’s worth checking out his environmental record. After all, Trudeau wouldn’t have joined the protestors at Standing Rock, he’d be with Trump signing off on yet another environmental disaster that is destroying the lands of Indigenous Peoples.

Using Trudeau’s name as a signifier for feminism erases the real work of women globally to end the white supremacist capitalist patriarchy. It ignores his sale of arms to the Saudi government and his full support of pipelines and the Tar Sands. Trudeau is a hypocrite. Not a feminist.

*  Clearly, I always knew this. And, did not come across this information in a comment on twitter.

 

Part One is here.

What’s your number – an interesting take on consent

Screen Shot 2017-04-19 at 14.50.34What’s your number is a typical asinine rom-com starring Anna Faris as Ally Darling and Chris Evans as Colin Shea. The simple premise is Darling discovering that the number of sexual partners she has had (19) makes her a slut – as evidenced in a “women’s magazine” she read after being fired from her job. So, with the help of deeply slimy neighbour Shea, Darling tracks down all her ex-boyfriends to see which one should be her partner for life. Because there is a magic number of men that having sex with  would make her even more of a slut than she actually is. Shea is an unemployed musician who has sex with a different woman every night and spends his mornings hiding in Darling’s apartment so the (many) woman will leave his apartment without anything creepy like having a conversation. Strangely, at no point do we ever hear Shea’s sexual history being as being slutty.

And, yes, by know you are all wondering why I continued watching the film. As did I.

But, somewhere in this film about a woman freaking out over other women calling her a slut, believing she is a slut, an unpleasant mother whining about her daughter not having enough ‘class’, and the useless father, there is seen involving consent discussed appropriately. Obviously, and this needs no spoiler warning, Shea falls in love with Darling (and eventually she with him once she gets over silly things like being able to pay the rent) and they end up almost having sex. Despite being an utter shite in his treatment of women as sex objects, when Darling says no Shea accepts it. There is some silliness about how much of a penis in a vagina constitutes sex but that is a clearly a joke.

There is no coercion. No attempts to convince Darling. She says no. He stops.

The director chooses to ruin this demonstration of consent but having some  dude from 20 years rock up to tell Darling they never had sex so actually she’s not really a mega slut having gone over 20 partners (and no recognition that sex she cannot remember will have made her too drunk to consent).

The film is pretty much the essence of shaming women for having sex with multiple partners. Yet the only actual sex scene in the film involves a discussion of consent that is real and clear. It is a weird juxtaposition.The film is utterly tedious and probably shouldn’t ever be watched ever again. By anyone.

#MakingWorkVisible for #IWD2017

#womenwrites (12.11)

Get Your People at Crunk Feminist Collective

About the ‘Left’ and its Discontents in These Perilous Times  via @sunnysingh_nw3

It’s too soon for you by Talat Yaqoob

Make no mistake – Donald Trump’s victory represents a racist “whitelash” by Maya Goodfellow

White women sold out the sisterhood and the world by voting for Trump.  via @doublexmag

After the election of Donald Trump, we will not mourn. We will organize | Gloria Steinem

“On ‘Woke’ White People Advertising their Shock that Racism just won a Presidency” by Courtney Parker West

7 Women Besides Susan B. Anthony Whose Graves Deserve “I Voted” Stickers at Bustle

Blood, Sweat and Tears: Medieval Literature, Cambridge, and Leonard Cohen  via @LucyAllenFWR

Equal Rights; Different Needs   by Polly Neate

Breaking the Cycle: the challenges of parenting after an abusive childhood  via @WomanAsSubject

If women aren’t a class, there’s no such thing as radical feminism by Cherry Blossom Life

Bounty should be banned from maternity wards by @lisaaglass

The Importance of Conversations and Community by @jendella
via @WritersofColour

#womenwrites (7.11.16)

The Historian’s Altmetrics: How can we measure the impact of people in the past? by Dr. Michelle Morovac

With Brexit the Tories have made sure we all have egg on our faces via by Kiri Kankhwende @WritersofColour

For the White Woman Who Wants to Know How to be My Friend: A Black Feminist Guide to Interracial Solidarity by @ClaireShrugged

Feminism, pornography and lots of crying in the loos: Lennie Goodings reflects on 43 years of Virago 

National Treasure at Rape Crisis Scotland

End this misogynistic horror show. Put Hillary Clinton in the White House | Barbara Kingsolver

One woman’s brush with Sharia courts in the UK: “It ruined my life forever” by Rahila Gupta

Feminism and the Social Model of Disability by Heather Downs

The Stunning Literariness of Solange by Panashe Chigumadzi

Tattooing your name on your partner’s forehead is an act of control, not devotion  by @glosswitch

For the White Woman Who Wants to Know How to be My Friend: A Black Feminist Guide to Interracial solitary  by @ClaireShrugged

How ‘sex work’ killed the victim by RAQUEL ROSARIO SANCHEZ

The short list for the Zero Tolerance Write to End Violence Against Women and Girls Award. via @WritetoEndVAW

#womenwrites

If Keith Vaz paid for sex, his prostitution report is biased and worthless by @bindelj

I’m sick of living in a culture that tolerates violence against women | Joan Smith

Why I was wrong about men by Suzanne Moore

White Feminist Fatigue Syndrome  via @critlegthinking

Passing Moments via @Carregonnen

Men Don’t Have Periods – Women Do by Samantha Rea

Being Told You Have Gender Dysphoria as a Lesbian at Nymeses

An Attitude About Gratitude: On Colin Kaepernick, Paul Finebaum, & What Black People Do Not Owe America @writermrsmith

Understanding Disability: Like me, you are different. Like you, I am equal by @mailbykite via @WritersofColour

‘Baby Brain’ and Other Myths by @jendella via @WritersofColour

I chose radical feminism over my porn-using boyfriend and got my humanity back by Rose Meltzer  via @FeministCurrent

Why I won’t be returning to teach in the classroom by Gurmeet Kaur http://buff.ly/2cu9JhF via @WritersofColour

#womenwrites – a collection of essential writing by women

All Bodies are Beautiful by @MurderofGoths

When words fail by @Durre_Shahwar

My self (at 35) by @reimaginingme

“Not All Men? Well, actually…” by Alicen Grey

The ignorance aimed at Caster Semenya flies in the face of the Olympic spirit | Katrina Karkazis

Black women and the accusation of taking up too much space by  Bridget Minamore

Stop Close Reading by Heather Horn

The Women in My Family Had to Be Good With Money  by Dena Landon

The chore wars by Alecia Simmonds

The sex trade can never be legalised without hurting women – by Kat Banyard

Men hate us by Purple Sage Feminist

“You throw like a girl”  A brief guide to  gender policing  via @WomanAsSubject

It’s Not the ‘Gender Pay Gap’ – It’s the Maternal Income Gap  via @VOlorenshaw

Race/Class/Gender: French secularism and Whiteness  by @saramsalem

More practice, less perfect: How do we navigate the lion’s den of feminist discussions? by Andie Fox

#womenwrites – a collation of essential writing by women

A collation of brilliant writing by women

#womenwrites for February 2016

(Re)Writing the Margins: Radical Feminism and Reproductive Justice Book Call for Papers

There has been a plethora of feminist texts and anthologies published on motherhood and feminist mothering in the past ten years, but there has been very little published with a radical feminist perspective on feminist mothering, the patriarchal institution of motherhood, the advent of reproductive technology and the backlash on single mothers. Adrienne Rich’s Of Woman Born is the quintessential radical feminist text on motherhood and feminist mothering and its influence is clear in numerous modern texts, but not from within radical feminist communities. Radical feminist writing has been relegated to online communities – such as the powerful collective blog Motherhood is a Feminist Issue – where debates have raged over the question of mothers having more privilege over non-mothers and whether or not it is possible to be a radical feminist within a heterosexual relationship.

Much of these debates have become polarised into two camps: mothers vs. non-mothers reinforcing the very patriarchal systems radical feminism was created to overthrow by policing women’s bodies to reflect political positions. Even fewer of the numerous anthologies and online writing has examined the issue of reproductive justice from within a radical feminist framework.

(Re)Writing the Margins is a collection of radical feminist essays, personal experiences, poetry and short stories on reproductive justice and radical feminist mothering within a white supremacist capitalist-patriarchy. We welcome submissions from researchers, activists, artists, mothers, children, grandmothers, and community members; we encourage submissions of both scholarly chapters and creative works that explore radical feminist theory and practise in relation to reproductive justice.

The anthology will examine the following topics:

  • Compulsory heterosexuality, heteronormativity and child-rearing
  • Wifework
  • Reproductive Justice for Whom? The impacts of racism, classism, disablism, homophobia on abortion, birth control, miscarriage, caring, mental illness etc.
  • Male violence and the ‘children need fathers’ rhetoric
  • Infertility and Reproductive Technology
  • Remaining childless as a choice.
  • Raising sons as a radical feminist.
  • Raising children in a pornified world
  • Defining gender – on whose terms?

Abstracts: Please send a 250-word description of the proposed paper, including a tentative title to louisepennington@hotmail.com. Along with this, please include a 50-100 word biography and your full contact information.

Deadline for abstracts is April 30 2016

Full Manuscripts: Please ensure that the manuscript conforms to Chicago style, and is 15-20 pages (double-spaced) in length. Final acceptance of the manuscript for inclusion in the collection rests upon its fit with the rest.

Deadline for full manuscripts is July 30 1016

To Submit: Please direct all submissions and inquiries to Louise Pennington at louisepennington@hotmail.com